10 Best Hammers For General Use With Reviews – 2017 | Research Core

Introduction To The Best Carpenter/Framing/Claw Hammers For General Use.

magnetic-nail-starterWhen you think about beginning a collection of tools, you want to start with the basics.  If you ask someone what the most basic necessary tools might be, odds are that one of the first things any person would say is: HAMMER.  Hammers are the all-around workhorses of the tool community.   They are used to create and destroy, repair and remove, and are a requirement for just about any project or work environment. 

What Is a hammer?

So many different types of hammers exist today:  carpenter hammers, framing hammers, claw hammer, and titanium hammer.  How does one know which one to choose?  The best hammer for the job, as with any tool, depends on the job itself and the user.  Hammers vary greatly in terms of size or length, shape, type, structure, grip, function, weight, and construction.




Lets Take a Look at The 10 Best Hammers Available Today With Reviews

Best Seller:
Image:
Product:
Average User
Satisfaction:

# 1

Stanley 51-624 20-Ounce
Rip Claw Fiberglass Hammer
4.7 Stars (4.7 / 5)


# 2
Stiletto Tools Titan 14-Ounce
Titanium Framing Hammer
4.6 Stars (4.6 / 5)


# 3
The Original Pink Box PB12HM 12-Ounce
Claw Hammer, Pink
4.8 Stars (4.8 / 5)


# 4
Estwing E3-16S 16 oz Straight Claw Hammer
with Smooth Face & Shock Reduction Grip
4.8 Stars (4.8 / 5)


# 5
Stiletto TB15MC TiBone 15-Ounce
Titanium Milled-Face Hammer
4.6 Stars (4.6 / 5)


# 6
Maxcraft 60626 8-oz.
Stubby Claw Hammer
4.8 Stars (4.8 / 5)


# 7
Stanley 51-616 16 Ounce
Hickory Handle Nailing Hammer
4.5 Stars (4.5 / 5)


# 8
Estwing E16S 16 oz Straight Claw Hammer
with Smooth Face & Leather Grip
4.6 Stars (4.6 / 5)


# 9
Stanley 51-163 16-Ounce
FatMax Xtreme AntiVibe Rip Claw Nailing Hammer
4.7 Stars (4.7 / 5)


# 10
TEKTON 30403 Jacketed Fiberglass
Ball Pein Hammer, 16-Ounce
4.7 Stars (4.7 / 5)





The hammers we will discuss today are all handheld hammers.  Powered versions also exist for more heavy-duty purposes.  The basic structure of a hammer is the head (the striking portion used to deliver the blows) and the handle (where the hammer is gripped by the user).  The structure of the head depends greatly on the job the hammer is needed to do.  In its most basic element, a hammer is designed to strike blows to objects.  In its simplest terms, hammers are used to drive in nails, fit parts together, forge metal, or break objects apart.  Hammers used for nailing are often referred to as framing hammers, carpenter hammers, or claw hammers.

The construction of a hammer has an effect on the task for which it should be used.  For example, a hammer built with a narrow head delivers the force to a small area.  A broad or large hammer head delivers spreads the blow to a wider area.  Shorter handles provide better control, but longer handles deliver more power.  Wood handles, while being breakable, also are able to absorb some of the vibration from the strike.  Steel handles transfer that vibration from the user, which could be painful.  However, they are more durable.  Other materials, such as fiberglass, may be more durable and comfortable, but may cost more.

Be sure you select a hammer you can control, meaning not too heavy or too long.  Also, determine whether you’ll be working primarily with wood or metal and how often you plan to use your hammer.  A professional needing a hammer may need to spend more for quality equipment that will last longer.  A person working primary with metal will want to consider a ball-peen hammer over a carpenter’s hammer or framing hammer. 


Stanley 51-624 Rip Claw Fiberglass Hammer Review

Stanley Fiber Glass Claw Hammer

Stanley 14 oz Claw Hammer

The Stanley 51-624 claw hammer absorbs the shock of the blows with its fiberglass construction.  Available in weights from 7 ounce to 20 ounce depending on the purpose, this Stanley model is remarkably light weight.  In addition, it has a textured rubber handle for a secure grip.  An added feature of this hammer is the yellow color which provides high visibility and recognition at the job site.

The head is made of steel, meaning it is durable, while the fiberglass handle reduces the weight.   The 20 ounce model is 12.8 inches long and is described by reviews as being a balanced hammer with a reasonable cost.


Stiletto Tools Titan 14-OunceTitanium Best Framing Hammer Review

Best framing hammer

Stiletto 14 oz Framing Hammer

 

The Stiletto Tools TI14MC is a framing hammer that boasts a wooden handle with a titanium head.  A titanium hammer would normally have a raised price, but this Stiletto is priced competitively.    The titanium head offers improved shock absorption and less recoil and vibration than steel head hammers.

This model has a curved handle for increased control and greater swing leverage, resulting in more powerful blows.  Made from American hickory, this handle means the hammer weighs in a light 14 ounces to decrease user fatigue.    A special feature of this framing hammer is the magnetic nail groove on the nose of the hammer for easy nail sets that avoid smashed fingers.  At 18 inches long, this hammer’s length provides a lot of leverage which equates to more power. 


The Original Pink Box PB12HM Review

Pink Hammer

The Original 12 oz pink hammer

The Original Pink Box PB12HM comes in 12 ounce or 20 ounce weight, with the 20 ounce model being 15 inches in length.  This model has a steel head with a fiberglass handle with durable resin coating that also allows it to absorb shock more effectively than carpenter hammers with wooden handles.

This hammer is stunning with a bright pink color that enables it to stand out in any working environment.  The rubberized easy grip covers a curved handle for improved leverage.   With a lifetime warranty from the manufacturer, this tool is a keeper.  Excellent choice for women or men who know that REAL MEN use pink tools! 


Estwing Mfg Co. E3-16S Review

estwing leather hammer

Estwing Claw Hammer

The Estwing Mfg Co. E3-16S is an all-steel hammer with a unique construction- head and handle were all forged of one piece of steel, reducing the danger of the hammer head flying from the handle.  This design makes this claw hammer solid and balanced.  The steel handle is also covered with an attractive blue UV coating and with a bonded and molded Shock Reduction Grip that reduces shock up to 70%. 

The Estwing is noted as the perfect hammer for driving and removing nails.  Available in 12 ounce to 22 ounce sizes, the medium 16 ounce size is 13 inches long.  The rip claw on this carpenter hammer is perfect for removing nails painlessly and easily.


Stiletto TB15MC TiBone Review

Stiletto Titanium Hammer

Stilettos Titanium Framing Hammer

The Stiletto TB15MC TiBone is a titanium hammer with recoil reduced up to ten times compared to steel heads!  The titanium head is more durable and lighter and absorbs more shock than other materials.  A magnetic nail holder is an added convenience that enables one-handed nail starts and the ergonomic grip with hardwearing rubber makes this hammer feel as though it belongs in your hand.

The face of this hammer is covered in steel, so it can be replaced to extend the life of the hammer, with either smooth or milled face. This 15 ounce hammer has 18 inches in length, making it lighter weight with significant power.


Maxcraft 60626 8-oz. Stubby Claw Hammer Review

Maxcraft stubby claw hammer

Maxcraft 8 oz Claw Hammer

At only six inches in length, the Maxcraft 60626 Stubby Claw Hammer can handle tight work areas and hard to reach places with ease.  Only 12 ounces in weight with a steel-forged head, this hammer is a great choice for small jobs as well.  Featuring a non-slip, countered handle grip for comfort, the Maxcraft stubby hammer also has a magnet head for one-handed nail starts.


Stanley 51-616 16 Ounce Hickory Handle Nailing Hammer Review

Stanley Nailing Hammer

Stanley 51-616 16 oz Hammer

The Stanley 51-616 Sixteen Ounce Hickory Handle Nailing Hammer is a versatile carpenter hammer with a limited lifetime warranty from the manufacturer.  In addition to the 16 ounce model discussed here, this hammer comes in a variety of weights:  7 ounces, 13 ounces, and 22 ounces.  The heads of all models are forged from high-carbon steel.  The bell face is polished and heat treated.    The handles are all hickory woodThe Stanley 51-616 sixteen ounce model measures at 13.3 inches in length, packing a lot of drive and power.


Estwing E16S 16 oz. Straight Claw Hammer with Smooth Face & Leather Grip Review

Estwing Claw Hammer

Estwing 16 oz Claw Hammer

The Estwing E16S has a head and handled forced in one piece of steel through a patented design that provides excellent balance.  The head and face are both polished and the handle boasts a genuine leather grip.  At 16 ounces, this hammer is a comfortable 12.3 inches in length.


Stanley 51-163 16-Ounce FatMax Xtreme AntiVibe Rip Claw Nailing Hammer Review

Stanley Nailing Hammer

Stanley 16 oz Hammer

The Stanley 51-163 16-Ounce FatMax Rip Claw Hammer is specially designed to rip apart wood, as opposed to curved claw hammers which are designed for removing nails.  Stanley has patented the torsion control grip technology of this hammer to reduce the effects of torque on user elbows and wrists.  Stanley also patented the AntiVibe technology that minimizes shock at impact of the blow and minimizes vibration during use. 

This 16 ounce hammer is forced in one piece with steel (head and handle forced as one piece instead of two) to provide masterful balance, strength, and durability.   This model also has a lifetime warranty to protect the investment of the user.  At 16 ounces and 16 inches long, this is a powerful, large hammer.


TEKTON 30403 Jacketed Fiberglass Ball-Pein Hammer, 16-Ounce Review

Best Ball-Been Hammer

Tekton 16 oz Ball-Pein Hammer

The Tekton 30403 is a fiberglass ball-peen (sometimes spelled ball-pein) hammer, the only machinist’s hammer in this article. Sometimes a titanium hammer or a framing hammer or a carpenter hammer won’t do because sometimes the best hammer is a ball peen hammer.

Instead of a claw on the head, this hammer has a rounded end opposite the face (the “normal” hammer end, where the hammer strikes objects).  These hammers are primarily used in metal work.  The smoothly rounded ball end allows the user to shape sheet metal to a precise degree.  At 16 ounces and 13 inches long, this hammer provides some power.  Made from lightweight fiberglass, the handle is covered with a non-slip grip that absorbs shock.  The core of the hammer is covered in a poly jacket that absorbs the impact of missed strikes. 


You might also enjoy these guides:

An accurate level to make sure everything is perfect. 

Check Out The Video Below For Some More Information On Hammers.